4 Tips to Gain and Retain More Real Estate Leads

Posted On April 30, 2012

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4 Tips to Gain and Retain More Real Estate Leads

Posted By susanne On April 29, 2012 @ 1:04 pm In Business Development,Marketing,Real Estate,Real Estate News,Real Estate Technology | Comments Disabled

[1]Your overall success is a direct result of your ability to network and generate leads. The more leads you bring in, the more people you talk to and the more sales opportunities you will create. The key is to proactively connect with the right people and then follow up consistently. Consistency builds trust and establishes you as the go-to professional within your market.

Lead generation is not a task for the faint of heart. It is a daily commitment that can include cold calls, drip email campaigns, direct mail, search engine optimization and more.

Finding leads is only the first step. Gaining and then retaining those leads requires you to put detailed measures in place to stay in front of prospects by offering knowledgeable advice in an easy to receive format.

So where do you begin? Identify your strengths and what it is you have to offer that your target audience finds valuable. In real estate, that could be a multitude of things. The niche in which you specialize, your long standing history within the community or your stellar sales team that offers unsurpassed customer service and support.

Recognize what sets you apart and then work to capitalize on that through four simple strategies to not only gain new leads, but retain them as clients.

1. Your Website and Blog

Your website and blog can be an excellent way to capture the attention of lookie-loos, turn them into leads and eventually clients. There are several ways you can ask visitors to take action:

• Place widgets in the sidebar with a free giveaway and a clear call to action. Examples would be a webinar or seminar, free e-book or a subscription to your newsletter.

• Include a chat widget that provides an easy way for leads to connect with you at the exact moment they are online.

• Add the Facebook “Like” Box [2] to your website, and display your latest posts allowing visitors to LIKE your page without leaving your website.

The purpose of this method is to provide incoming leads a way to get to know you and your business while educating them on how you can assist in their home buying/selling process. This also supplies you with a means to collect their contact information so you can continue to communicate with them and build a relationship. However, you must add an “opt-in” mechanism. Consumers must check the box that says they want to hear more from you, i.e. subscribe to your newsletters. Once they have opted-in to hear from you, you can add them to your database and a drip marketing campaign so that when the time does come and they’re ready to buy or sell, your name will be at the top of their list.

2. Start a Neighborhood Page

Create a Facebook page [3] dedicated to a particular neighborhood or community. This idea takes the old marketing tactic of prospecting to a whole new level! Rather than sending drip emails or postcards, create a page on Facebook that caters to one specific group of people. This type of lead generation works best if you live within the area and are looking to establish yourself as the area expert.

How to Use the Page:

• Shoot video around the neighborhood displaying unique attributes
• Talk about upcoming events and ask neighbors to post pictures after the fact
• Talk about homes that are on the market and discuss property values within the community
• Throw a housewarming party for homes you sell within the neighborhood and promote it on your community site inviting neighbors to join in as welcoming committee
• Talk about community concerns in a positive light and ask for feedback on how to solve the challenge

3. Word of Mouth

Word-of-mouth marketing is one of the least expensive, but most effective forms of marketing. While many of our lead generation tools and methods may have changed due to the Internet and social media, this concept remains the same. Connect with people who know, like and trust you. Continue to provide value and eventually they will become advocates on your behalf.

Third party word-of mouth referrals [4] add instant credibility to your business. They also bring you back to the core of real estate marketing by tapping into your sphere of influence. This is a basic foundational pillar that should be included in any real estate professionals marketing plan.

4. Get Online & Network

Just like in-person networking events, networking amongst your peers and other professionals online will help you:

• Build your personal brand
• Establish yourself as the local expert
• Generate referrals from others around the country

Real estate is more than listings and commissions; it’s about relationships and allowing others to get to know who you really are. Interact with professionals across the country by commenting on their blogs, sharing on Facebook, retweeting a relevant link to your community on Twitter or saying congrats when you see a change in status on LinkedIn.

Show anyone you come in contact with why you love where you live and what they can look forward to when working with you.

Last but Not Least: Be Patient!

The downside to any lead generation strategy is that it takes time and work. It could be months before you see the fruits of your labor, so make sure you pick an idea you enjoy and believe in. If you don’t like being online; creating a blog, website or Facebook campaign will only frustrate and eventually defeat you.

The upside is the exponential growth you can see within your business if you manage your leads correctly. Remember that anything worth your time and energy will require sacrifice. Be willing to go the extra mile for your leads and the systems you put in place.

For more information or to read this article on Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate blog, “Clean Slate,” visit http://bhgrealestateblog.com/2012/02/27/4-tips-to-gain-and-retain-more-real-estate-leads/ [5].


Article printed from RISMedia: http://rismedia.com

URL to article: http://rismedia.com/2012-04-29/4-tips-to-gain-and-retain-more-real-estate-leads/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://rismedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/4-Tips-to-Gain-and-Retain.jpg

[2] Facebook “Like” Box: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/plugins/like-box/

[3] Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php

[4] word-of mouth referrals: http://bhgrealestateblog.com/2012/01/20/build-your-business-by-referral-explode-your-results/

[5] http://bhgrealestateblog.com/2012/02/27/4-tips-to-gain-and-retain-more-real-estate-leads/: http://bhgrealestateblog.com/2012/02/27/4-tips-to-gain-and-retain-more-real-estate-leads/

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9 Timeless Leadership Lessons from Cyrus the Great

Posted On April 30, 2012

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Forget 1-800-CEO Read. The greatest book on business and leadership was written in the 4th century BC by a Greek about a Persian King. Yeah, that’s right.

Behold: Cyrus the Great, the man that historians call “the most amiable of conquerors,” and the first king to found “his empire on generosity” instead of violence and tyranny. Consider Cyrus the antithesis to Machiavelli’s ideal Prince. The author, himself the opposite of Machiavelli, was Xenophon, a student of Socrates.

The book is a veritable classic in the art of leadership, execution, and responsibility. Adapted from Larry Hendrick’s excellent translation, here are nine lessons in leadership from Xenophon’s Cyrus the Great:

Be Self-Reliant

“Never be slow in replenishing your supplies. You’ll always bee on better terms with your allies if you can secure your own provisions…Give them all they need and your troops will follow you to the end of the earth.”

Be Generous

“Success always calls for greater generosity–though most people, lost in the darkness of their own egos, treat it as an occasion for greater greed. Collecting boot [is] not an end itself, but only a means for building [an] empire. Riches would be of little use to us now–except as a means of winning new friends.”

Be Brief

“Brevity is the soul of command. Too much talking suggests desperation on the part of the leader. Speak shortly, decisively and to the point–and couch your desires in such natural logic that no one can raise objections. Then move on.”

Be a Force for Good

“Whenever you can, act as a liberator. Freedom, dignity, wealth–these three together constitute the greatest happiness of humanity. If you bequeath all three to your people, their love for you will never die.”

Be in Control

[After punishing some renegade commanders] “Here again, I would demonstrate the truth that, in my army, discipline always brings rewards.”

Be Fun

“When I became rich, I realized that no kindness between man and man comes more naturally than sharing food and drink, especially food and drink of the ambrosial excellence that I could now provide. Accordingly, I arranged that my table be spread everyday for many invitees, all of whom would dine on the same excellent food as myself. After my guests and I were finished, I would send out any extra food to my absent friends, in token of my esteem.”

Be Loyal

[When asked how he planned to dress for a celebration] “If I can only do well by my friends, I’ll look glorious enough in whatever clothes I wear.”

Be an Example

“In my experience, men who respond to good fortune with modesty and kindness are harder to find than those who face adversity with courage.”

Be Courteous and Kind

“There is a deep–and usually frustrated–desire in the heart of everyone to act with benevolence rather than selfishness, and one fine instance of generosity can inspire dozens more. Thus I established a stately court where all my friends showed respect to each other and cultivated courtesy until it bloomed into perfect harmony.”

There’s a reason Cyrus found students and admirers in his own time as well as the ages that followed. From Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin to Julius Caesar and Alexander (and yes, even Machiavelli) great men have read his inspiring example and put it to use in the pursuit of their own endeavors.

That isn’t bad company.

Next–> See 9 Timeless Business Virtues from a 19th Century Self-Made Millionaire

Ryan Holiday is the author of Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator (Penguin/Portfolio). More of his writing can be found at RyanHoliday.net, and you can sign up for monthly reading recommendations through his reading list email.

8 Ways to Keep Creativity Fresh While Scaling a Start-up

Posted On April 30, 2012

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Ideas can grow stale once a start-up scales. We asked successful young entrepreneurs why its important to continue sparking creativity while a company is growing fast.

shutterstock images

 

The Young Entrepreneur Council asked eight successful young entrepreneurs to give their best tips for successfully scaling a start-up team, while still keeping the creative environment fresh. Here are their best answers.

1. Can I Buy You a Drink?

Matt Mickiewicz

Look for a strong cultural fit when hiring for your start-up—and not just their resume and experience. If you don’t get along with a person—wouldn’t enjoy having Friday beers with them—then don’t bring them onto your team. The negative impact on morale from making a wrong hire can be tremendous, so be careful. Fire quickly if things don’t work out.
Matt Mickiewicz, 99designs

2. Spread the Recognition

Danny Wong

To scale a start-up and keep work interesting, you’ll want to frequently announce milestones reached, but also press your team for constant improvement. When your team starts to realize they’re really contributing to a business that’s making real progress, and are learning a lot more than they have at any other work environment, they’ll never leave.
Danny WongBlank Label Group

3. Start a Chain Reaction

Danny Wong

Best piece of advice I ever heard was only hire those you would trust to hire others without consulting you. If you start off with an amazing team of creative people and follow that rule, your team should continue to have the same creative touch.
Ben Lang, EpicLaunch


4. Share the Business Vision

Nathalie Lussier

When you’re leading your company, no matter how employees you have or want to bring on, it helps to share the business vision. If you have new projects or different tasks that need to get done, your team is a lot more likely to get on board when they know where you’re going. That in itself will keep the environment humming.
Nathalie Lussier, Nathalie Lussier Media

5. Only as Strong as Your Weakest Link

Lucas Sommer

Find areas where you are weakest and hire passionate experts in those areas. Keep in mind you can teach skills very easily, but teaching personality and attitude is next to impossible. Find people with passion and personality that fit your organization and then teach them skills in the areas where you are lacking. 
Lucas Sommer, Audimated

6. Trial Runs With the Team

Aaron Schwartz

Keeping the creative environment and culture strong are critical for a startup. Great candidates on paper may not fit with your current team. Hire everyone as a contractor at first — take four to ten weeks to make sure that they fit within your culture, and give the new employee the same courtesy to make sure that she or he is happy with your team!
Aaron Schwartz, Modify Watches

7. Let the Team Grow Too!

Brent Beshore

Delegate and trust your team. It’s the only way to grow effectively. A startup owner can’t do everything, and trying to simply stifles your team. One of the appeals of a startup is how much growth it affords its people; delegate so you don’t deny them that.
Brent Beshore, AdVentures

8. Balance that Passion

John Hall

It’s important that you balance a startup with creative people and people who can execute. You need the creative people to take your company to new levels, but it’s equally as important to have the employees that will “get stuff done”.
John Hall, Digital Talent Agents

 


The Young Entrepreneur Council is an invite-only nonprofit organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. The YEC leads #FixYoungAmerica. @TheYEC

Intelligence Is Overrated: What You Really Need To Succeed

Posted On April 27, 2012

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Albert Einstein’s was estimated at 160, Madonna’s is 140, and John F. Kennedy’s was only 119, but as it turns out, your IQ score pales in comparison with your EQ, MQ, and BQ scores when it comes to predicting your success and professional achievement.

IQ tests are used as an indicator of logical reasoning ability and technical intelligence. A high IQ is often a prerequisite for rising to the top ranks of business today. It is necessary, but it is not adequate to predict executive competence and corporate success. By itself, a high IQ does not guarantee that you will stand out and rise above everyone else.

Research carried out by the Carnegie Institute of Technology shows that 85 percent of your financial success is due to skills in “human engineering,” your personality and ability to communicate, negotiate, and lead. Shockingly, only 15 percent is due to technical knowledge. Additionally, Nobel Prize winning Israeli-American psychologist, Daniel Kahneman, found that people would rather do business with a person they like and trust rather than someone they don’t, even if the likeable person is offering a lower quality product or service at a higher price.

With this in mind, instead of exclusively focusing on your conventional intelligence quotient, you should make an investment in strengthening your EQ (Emotional Intelligence), MQ (Moral Intelligence), and BQ (Body Intelligence). These concepts may be elusive and difficult to measure, but their significance is far greater than IQ.

13 images Photos: World’s Most Famous Introverts

The Five Personalities of Innovators: Which One Are You? Brenna Sniderman Forbes Staff

12 Ways To Spot A Liar At Work Carol Kinsey Goman Contributor

Facebook Can Tell You If A Person Is Worth Hiring Kashmir Hill Forbes Staff

Emotional Intelligence

EQ is the most well known of the three, and in brief it is about: being aware of your own feelings and those of others, regulating these feelings in yourself and others, using emotions that are appropriate to the situation, self-motivation,  and building relationships.

Top Tip for Improvement: First, become aware of your inner dialogue. It helps to keep a journal of what thoughts fill your mind during the day. Stress can be a huge killer of emotional intelligence, so you also need to develop healthy coping techniques that can effectively and quickly reduce stress in a volatile situation.

Moral Intelligence

MQ directly follows EQ as it deals with your integrity, responsibility, sympathy, and forgiveness. The way you treat yourself is the way other people will treat you. Keeping commitments, maintaining your integrity, and being honest are crucial to moral intelligence.

Top Tip for Improvement: Make fewer excuses and take responsibility for your actions. Avoid little white lies. Show sympathy and communicate respect to others. Practice acceptance and show tolerance of other people’s shortcomings. Forgiveness is not just about how we relate to others; it’s also how you relate to and feel about yourself.

Body Intelligence

Lastly, there is your BQ, or body intelligence, which reflects what you know about your body, how you feel about it, and take care of it. Your body is constantly telling you things; are you listening to the signals or ignoring them? Are you eating energy-giving or energy-draining foods on a daily basis? Are you getting enough rest? Do you exercise and take care of your body? It may seem like these matters are unrelated to business performance, but your body intelligence absolutely affects your work because it largely determines your feelings, thoughts, self-confidence, state of mind, and energy level.

Top Tip For Improvement: At least once a day, listen to the messages your body is sending you about your health. Actively monitor these signals instead of going on autopilot. Good nutrition, regular exercise, and adequate rest are all key aspects of having a high BQ. Monitoring your weight, practicing moderation with alcohol, and making sure you have down time can dramatically benefit the functioning of your brain and the way you perform at work.

What You Really Need To Succeed

It doesn’t matter if you did not receive the best academic training from a top university. A person with less education who has fully developed their EQ, MQ, and BQ can be far more successful than a person with an impressive education who falls short in these other categories.

Yes, it is certainly good to be an intelligent, rational thinker and have a high IQ; this is an important asset. But you must realize that it is not enough. Your IQ will help you personally, but EQ, MQ, and BQ will benefit everyone around you as well. If you can master the complexities of these unique and often under-rated forms of intelligence, research tells us you will achieve greater success and be regarded as more professionally competent and capable.

Which type of intelligence is most important to success?

Emotional Intelligence – Being aware of your own feelings and those of others, regulating these feelings in yourself and others, using emotions that are appropriate to the situation, self-motivation, and building relationships.

Moral Intelligence – Integrity, responsibility, sympathy and forgiveness.

Body Intelligence – Your body intelligence largely determines your feelings, thoughts, self-confidence, state of mind, and energy level.

Emotional Intelligence, Moral Intelligence and Body Intelligence are all equally important.

 

 

CFO JOB DESCRIPTION

Posted On April 26, 2012

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Chief Financial Officer (CFO) job description

Overview

 

Job description of CEO include contents such as:

 

  1. Job purpose

 

  1. Key duties/tasks

 

  1. KRAs

 

  1. KPIs

 

  1. Job standard

 

  1. Job spec…

 

 

I/ Key job tasks of Chief Financial Officer – CFO job description

 

1. Strategy

  • As a true business partner to the CEO and divisional presidents, assess organizational performance against both the annual budget and company’s long-term strategy.
  • Develop tools and systems to provide critical financial and operational information to the CEO and make actionable recommendations on both strategy and operations.
  • Engage the board finance, audit, and investment committees around issues, trends, and changes in the operating model(s) and operational delivery.
  • Assist in establishing yearly objectives and meeting agendas, and selecting and engaging outside consultants (auditors, investment advisors).
  • Oversee long-term budgetary planning and costs management in alignment with company National Nonprofit’s strategic plan, especially as the organization considers sponsorships, potential acquisitions, and collaborations with external organizations.

2. Executive Management

  • Serve as a member of executive leadership team
  • Participate in key decisions pertaining to strategic initiatives, operating model and operational execution

3. Financial Planning and Analysis

  • Prepare and maintain regular financial planning reports; Monthly profit and loss forecast by division (vs. budget); Weekly 13 week cash flow forecast.
  • Complete analysis of financial results; Develop recommendations (strategic and tactical).
  • Develop and execute analysis of various business initiatives (e.g., opening new operations, asset acquisition, new service launches).
  • Develop and maintain capital budget.
  • Assist in development of financial planning and analysis exercises/reports.
  • Participate in calls with Lenders.

4. Finance

  • Oversee cash flow planning and ensure availability of funds as needed.
  • Oversee cash, investment, and asset management.
  • Oversee financing strategies and activities, as well as banking relationships.
  • Develop and utilize forward-looking, predictive models and activity-based financial analyses to provide insight into the organization’s operations and business plans.

 

5. Planning, Policy, and Investor Relations

  • Coordinate the development and monitoring of budgets.
  • Develop financial business plans and forecasts.
  • Participate in corporate policy development as a member of the senior management team.
  • Engage the finance committee of the board of directors to develop short-, medium-, and long-term financial plans and projections.
  • Represent the company to financial partners, including financial institutions, investors, foundation executives, auditors, public officials, etc.
  • Remain up to date on nonprofit audit best practices and state and federal law regarding nonprofit operations.

 

6. Accounting and Administration

  • Oversee the accounting department to ensure proper maintenance of all accounting systems and function; supervise company nonprofit’s finance staff.
  • Ensure maintenance of appropriate internal controls and financial procedures.
  • Ensure timeliness, accuracy, and usefulness of financial and management reporting for federal and state funders, foundations, and company nonprofit’s board of directors; oversee the preparation and communication of monthly and annual financial statements.
  • Coordinate audits and proper filing of tax returns.
  • Ensure legal and regulatory compliance regarding all financial functions.

 

7. Team Management

  • Mentor and develop a direct team of four, managing work allocation, training, problem resolution, performance evaluation, and the building of an effective team dynamic.
  • Guide larger, cross-divisional teams outside of direct span of control within the five main company national nonprofit program areas.

8. Accounting Activities

  • Oversee preparation of month-end, quarter-end and year-end financial statements
  • Review all month-end closing activities including general ledger maintenance, balance sheet reconciliations and corporate/overhead cost allocation
  • Enhance and implement financial and accounting systems, processes, tools and control systems
  • Serve as final point of escalation for Accounts Receivable/Accounts Payable issues
  • Develop and manage accounting staff
  • Serve as a key point of contact for external auditors; Manage preparation and support of all external audits

9. Cash Management

  • Oversee weekly cash management; Approve weekly payables; Execute check signing
  • Oversee AR management and provide support to collections activities

10. Corporate Development

  • Represent company in efforts with investment bankers and potential investors
  • Prepare various analyses and reports required by corporate development efforts

11. Insurance/Real Estate/Legal Affairs

  • Manage the company’s insurance program
  • Manage the company’s real estate affairs consisting of leases and sub-leases with various landlords; Negotiate new leases or lease renewals; Coordinate with real estate counsel
  • Manage the company’s legal affairs in the areas of cargo claims, bankruptcies and other small claims matters

 

II / Job specification of Chief Financial Officer – CFO job description

 

  1. A minimum of a BS; a CPA and/or MBA would be a plus.
  2. At least five years experience as CFO or equivalent, preferably in a nonprofit organization with a budget of at least $10 million.
  3. Deep knowledge and understanding of the Office of Management and Budget Circular A133 audit.
  4. Experience working with information technology staff to manage finance and accounting software packages.
  5. Excellent written and oral communication skills.
  6. Demonstrated leadership ability, team management, and interpersonal skills.
  7. Excellent analytical and abstract reasoning skills, plus excellent organization skills.
  8. Experience in a senior financial-management role, partnering with executive staff, resulting in the development and implementation of creative financial management strategies.
  9. Significant experience in or knowledge of nonprofit accounting, including sophisticated fund and grant accounting, compliance, and reporting.

CEO job description

Posted On April 26, 2012

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CEO is number one position in an organization. So that, identifying job description, KRAs, job specs, goals for this position are very important.

 

You can create CEO job description by management function as follows:

 

I/ Key job tasks of CEO job description

1. Planning

  • Creates annual operating plans that support strategic direction set by the board and correlate with annual operating budgets; submits annual plans to the board for approval
  • Collaborates with the board to define and articulate the organization’s vision and to develop strategies for achieving that vision
  • Develops and monitors strategies for ensuring the long-term financial viability of the organization
  • Develops future leadership within the organization
  • Promotes a culture that reflects the organization’s values, encourages good performance, and rewards productivity
  • Hires, manages, and fires the human resources of the organization according to authorized personnel policies and procedures that fully conform to current laws and regulations
  • Oversees the operations of organization and manages its compliance with legal and regulatory requirements
  • Creates and maintains procedures for implementing plans approved by the board of directors
  • Ensures that staff and board have sufficient and up-to-date information.
  • Evaluates the organization’s and the staff’s performance on a regular basis
  • Oversees staff in developing annual budgets that support operating plans and submits budgets for board approval
  • Prudently manages the organization’s resources within budget guidelines according to current laws and regulations
  • Ensures that staff practices all appropriate accounting procedures in compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
  • Provides prompt, thorough, and accurate information to keep the board appropriately informed of the organization’s financial position

2.  Management

3. Financial management

4. HR management

 

  • Recruitment and contracting of company and project staff;
  • Employee development, and training;
  • Policy development and documentation;
  • Employee relations;
  • Performance management and improvement systems;
  • Employment and compliance to regulatory concerns and reporting;
  • Company-wide committee facilitation including planning, production, staff and
  • Board of Directors, including arranging meetings and agendas, attending and minuting meetings;

 

5. Marketing and PR:

 

  • Manage advertising opportunities in other theatre program, press and at venues.
  • Organize the availability of company members for media/PR events as necessary.
  • Oversee content, production and distribution of all marketing and publicity materials (posters, program, flyers, mail outs, brochures etc) with director, designer and project manager.
  • Manage press development;
  • Co-ordinate the invitation of potential future promoters and supporters of the company.

 

7. Community Relationships

  • Serves as the primary spokesperson and representative for the organization 
  • Assures that the organization and its mission, programs, and services are consistently presented in a strong, positive image to relevant stakeholders
  • Actively advocates for the organization, its beliefs, and its programmatic efforts
  • Acts as a liaison between the organization and the community, building relationships with peer organizations when appropriate
  • Oversees design, delivery, and quality of programs and services
  • Stays abreast of current trends related to the organization’s products and services and anticipates future trends likely to have an impact on its work
  • Collects and analyzes evaluation information that measures the success of the organization’s program efforts; refines or changes programs in response to that information
  • Serves as a primary person in donor relationships and the person to make one-on-one fund raising solicitations
  • Develops fund raising strategies with the board and supports the board in fund raising activities
  • Oversees staff in the development and implementation of fund raising plans that support strategies adopted by the Development Committee
  • Oversees staff in the timely submission grant applications and progress reports for funders

8. Programmatic Effectiveness

6. Fund Raising

 

 

III/ TYPES OF EXECUTIVE JOB DESCRIPTION

 

Other executive positions that you should consider to create job descriptions as follows:

 

  1. Executive Director
  2. Operations manager
  3. Executive assistant
  4. General manager

 

 

CEO job description

Posted On April 26, 2012

Filed under Uncategorized

Comments Dropped leave a response

CEO is number one position in an organization. So that, identifying job description, KRAs, job specs, goals for this position are very important.

 

You can create CEO job description by management function as follows:

 

I/ Key job tasks of CEO job description

1. Planning

  • Creates annual operating plans that support strategic direction set by the board and correlate with annual operating budgets; submits annual plans to the board for approval
  • Collaborates with the board to define and articulate the organization’s vision and to develop strategies for achieving that vision
  • Develops and monitors strategies for ensuring the long-term financial viability of the organization
  • Develops future leadership within the organization
  • Promotes a culture that reflects the organization’s values, encourages good performance, and rewards productivity
  • Hires, manages, and fires the human resources of the organization according to authorized personnel policies and procedures that fully conform to current laws and regulations
  • Oversees the operations of organization and manages its compliance with legal and regulatory requirements
  • Creates and maintains procedures for implementing plans approved by the board of directors
  • Ensures that staff and board have sufficient and up-to-date information.
  • Evaluates the organization’s and the staff’s performance on a regular basis
  • Oversees staff in developing annual budgets that support operating plans and submits budgets for board approval
  • Prudently manages the organization’s resources within budget guidelines according to current laws and regulations
  • Ensures that staff practices all appropriate accounting procedures in compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
  • Provides prompt, thorough, and accurate information to keep the board appropriately informed of the organization’s financial position

2.  Management

3. Financial management

4. HR management

 

  • Recruitment and contracting of company and project staff;
  • Employee development, and training;
  • Policy development and documentation;
  • Employee relations;
  • Performance management and improvement systems;
  • Employment and compliance to regulatory concerns and reporting;
  • Company-wide committee facilitation including planning, production, staff and
  • Board of Directors, including arranging meetings and agendas, attending and minuting meetings;

 

5. Marketing and PR:

 

  • Manage advertising opportunities in other theatre program, press and at venues.
  • Organize the availability of company members for media/PR events as necessary.
  • Oversee content, production and distribution of all marketing and publicity materials (posters, program, flyers, mail outs, brochures etc) with director, designer and project manager.
  • Manage press development;
  • Co-ordinate the invitation of potential future promoters and supporters of the company.

 

7. Community Relationships

  • Serves as the primary spokesperson and representative for the organization 
  • Assures that the organization and its mission, programs, and services are consistently presented in a strong, positive image to relevant stakeholders
  • Actively advocates for the organization, its beliefs, and its programmatic efforts
  • Acts as a liaison between the organization and the community, building relationships with peer organizations when appropriate
  • Oversees design, delivery, and quality of programs and services
  • Stays abreast of current trends related to the organization’s products and services and anticipates future trends likely to have an impact on its work
  • Collects and analyzes evaluation information that measures the success of the organization’s program efforts; refines or changes programs in response to that information
  • Serves as a primary person in donor relationships and the person to make one-on-one fund raising solicitations
  • Develops fund raising strategies with the board and supports the board in fund raising activities
  • Oversees staff in the development and implementation of fund raising plans that support strategies adopted by the Development Committee
  • Oversees staff in the timely submission grant applications and progress reports for funders

8. Programmatic Effectiveness

6. Fund Raising

 

 

III/ TYPES OF EXECUTIVE JOB DESCRIPTION

 

Other executive positions that you should consider to create job descriptions as follows:

 

  1. Executive Director
  2. Operations manager
  3. Executive assistant
  4. General manager

 

 

When It’s Time to Throw Out Your Business Plan

Posted On April 26, 2012

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Successfully growing your business requires regular questioning of the key elements of your plan. Here are five tips for keeping your business model fresh.

Founders at Work:  Stories of Startups’ Early Days, “throw out the business plan” and instead focus resources on a newer, better alternative. Consider these two examples of radical strategy shifts that keyed future success.

  • We have five tips to help entrepreneurs keep their business model fresh:

1.  Don’t be satisfied.

Find a way to constructively challenge your ideas about what is possible and how your business can do better. If necessary, hire someone or bring in a coach to help you through this process. Karl plays that role at Avondale, constantly asking, “WTF are we doing?” We would not have built the successes and options we have today without Karl continuously challenging the team to re-think the business.

2.  Create a constant stream of options.

We make an explicit choice each year to reinvest some of our profits into exploring new business opportunities and building options for future businesses. Remember that the value of your business is determined by the value of current operations plus the value of the options you have created. If you invest all of your time and resources into current operations, you may be leaving a lot of value on the table.

3.  Invest with discipline.

We set explicit objectives and metrics for our new business investments. E.g., our objectives might be to build a large customer pipeline within the first six months, land one significant deal in the first year, and become self-funding in the second year. We then define metrics around those objectives (e.g., what constitutes a “large” pipeline? What constitutes a “significant” deal?), and we are prepared to cut off that investment if we do not achieve our metrics.

4.  Test and learn.

As an entrepreneur, you hold a significant advantage:  when you find ideas that work you can implement them more quickly than large companies can. However, to do so you must train yourself and your team to have a “test and learn” mentality. Every customer interaction, every product idea, indeed every business decision gives you the opportunity to test and learn. Embrace those opportunities to try new approaches and evolve your approach to the business.

5.  Exploit your successes quickly and wholeheartedly.

Since ours is a people business, we are constantly pushing the team to hire more people more quickly so that we can put additional resources behind our early successes. By hiring more aggressively than the current business supports, we are forcing ourselves to invest in building adjacent business opportunities that can profitably employ those new hires.

This is not to say that you should bet the company every day in every way. However, you should be disciplined about periodically questioning the key elements of your current plan and asking yourself and your team whether it is time for evolution (or even revolution)!

Three Steps to Creating a Killer Mobile Site

Posted On April 26, 2012

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For many people, mobile devices, especially cell phones, are fast becoming the most popular route to the Internet. They want quick, easy access to information that will help them make decisions on the go — including whether or not to patronize your business.

Unfortunately not every small-business website functions well on cell phones. Many fail to load quickly, prove hard to navigate and make key information difficult to find.

To make your website more mobile friendly, consider these three steps, which put a priority on usefulness, speed and easy navigation.

1. Test your site on a cellular network.
Turn off your cell phone’s Wi-Fi connection so you’re using your wireless carrier’s data network. Then, launch your web browser and type in your business site’s URL.

Now, start counting. If it takes five seconds or less to fully load your home page, that’s pretty good. If it’s 10 seconds or more, there’s significant room for improvement.

If your site first displays a decorative splash page, video or a large image, it isn’t mobile friendly. These items take extra time to load and get in the way of useful information. Also, if your home page features Flash animation, it won’t display at all in many mobile browsers, and your site might appear to say nothing at all.

Related: Four Low-Cost Ways to Turbo-Charge Your Website

If your phone simply displays a miniature version of your complete website, that means mobile users must pinch, zoom and scroll to see what’s there. That’s more work, plus they’re more likely to accidentally click the wrong link or button. Your business’s most basic and vital information — such as address, hours and phone number — should be immediately visible when your site loads on a mobile device.

To get the most comprehensive results, repeat this exercise on several types of mobile phones. Consider asking your friends to access your site on their phones while you watch. Observe but don’t coach them on where to scroll or click.

2. Start with easy improvements.
Depending on the results of your tests, your site may need a major overhaul or just some tweaks. If a redesign seems necessary but is more than you can manage at the moment, you can start with a quick and easy fix.

If it isn’t already there, put the following information at the top of your site’s home page:

  • Business name
  • Brief description, such as “tax accountants,” “auto repair” or “fine French dining”
  • Street address
  • Hours of operation
  • Phone numbers for inquiries or reservations
  • Email address
  • Link to the mobile version of your site (I’ll explain this later)

This information should appear above any background or banner graphics so it loads first. After all, this is what most mobile visitors want to know.

Related: Step-by-Step Through a Website Makeover

There are several advantages to displaying this information as plain text rather than including it in an image. In most mobile web browsers, simply clicking a phone number starts the call. Similarly, clicking a street address launches the phone’s mapping app, and clicking an email address opens the mobile email app. If you make it this easy for mobile users, they’re much more likely to do business with you.

3. Build a user-friendly mobile version of your site.
Creating a mobile version of your site can be fairly straightforward. If you built your site with tools that offer a mobile theme layout, then you simply need to select a theme and apply it to your site. WordPress, one of the most popular site-building tools, has many free and inexpensive mobile themes.

You also can build a separate mobile site. There are many inexpensive services that nontechnical people can use, including Mofuse.com and Landr.co. Both let you create and publish a basic mobile site for less than $10 a month.

Related: Is Your Website Lost in Translation?

Mobile sites have a slightly different web address than the full site. The mobile version usually starts with “m.” before your regular web address, or ends with the suffix “.mobi” rather than “.com.” If a mobile user types in your regular URL or follows a link to your site from a search engine, the mobile version should load automatically.

But that doesn’t always happen on every phone. Include at the top of your website a link to your mobile site, and vice versa, just in case.

If you follow these three steps, not only will your business be more attractive and useful to mobile visitors, but you also may become more visible in mobile search results. 

 

The Case for Learning to Code

Posted On April 26, 2012

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Several experienced entrepreneurs argue that being a non-technical founder puts you at a severe disadvantage. It’s time to learn to code, already.

A few days ago here on Inc.com, Danielle Weinblatt, CEO of Take the Interview, wrote about her successful experience starting a software company even though she can’t code. Being a non-technical founder has clearly worked for Weinblatt, but across the Web several entrepreneurs are arguing that her experience is the exception rather than the rule, asserting that founders—even if they’re the marketing or business brain of the operation—really should learn how to code.

The first example comes from a post on Business Insider, which is provocatively titled “Non-Technical Founders Will Always Make Subpar Products That Fail Slowly.” In the post, Shontell relates the experience of New York Tech Meetup’s Nate Westheimer. He started out as a non-technical entrepreneur until he spoke to Drop.io’s founder Sam Lessin, who said: “Idea people who can’t code have to relay their vision to others, and part of the vision inevitably gets lost in translation. Lessin said non-technical founders like he and Westheimer fail slowly,” according to Shontell.

Despite Drop.io selling to Facebook, producing what could be seen as a successful end result for Lessin, Westheimer took this advice to heart, Shontell reports:

Westheimer took to books and started to learn back-end development. He was fueled by a product he wanted to build—an online meeting management system called OHours. Two years later, Westheimer is working on another startup, Picturelife. Instead of being the product manager like he used to be, Westheimer is the back-end developer. He’s working on Picturelife with OMGPOP founder Charles Forman and Threadless co-founder Jacob Dehart.

Forman told him, “I’m glad you learned to code, otherwise we wouldn’t have been able to work together.”  Forman and Dehart are both technical guys with a lot of ideas and designing talent, Westheimer explained. They didn’t need another idea guy, they needed a developer who could pull weight.

The bottom line for Wertheimer is if you have ambitions to start a software-based company and think you can’t or shouldn’t learn to code, think again. To help out he also offers tips to help you learn to be developer. And he’s not the only voice on Business Insider taking this position. Cristian Castillo, co-founder of instaDM, has also argued that at least rudimentary coding skills are key, though for slightly different reasons.

Who’s right, Weinblatt or Castillo and Westheimer?

Read more:

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